The mother die used for postal stationery cliches

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© Lars Engelbrecht

 

 

 


POSTAL CARDS - AN INTRODUCTION

 

THE FIRST DANISH POSTAL CARDS

Postal Cards was introduced in Denmark with Law of Post of 7.1.1871, that from 1.4.1871 introduces blue 2 skilling and red 4 skilling Postal Cards. 2 skilling Postal Cards were for local use, but could also be used in all of Denmark if they had printed text on the back (Official Announsement 30.3.1871). 4 skilling Postal Cards were used for in Denmark. The rate for Postal Cards was the same as the rate for letters.

Postal Cards were introduced on a time in Danish history, where the industrialisation was growing fast. And industry and trade used the Postal Cards a lot for ordering products. The price for a Postal Card was the same as the value of the stamp printed on Postal Card, so by using Postal Cards you saved the expence of envelope and paper.


Postal Card 2 skilling in size 140x75 mm send in Copenhagen 5.4.1871, only four days after issue. This is the first known use of a Postal Card in Denmark!

 

 

MY COLLECTION

See examples from my collection of:

Small skilling postal cards

Small ore postal cards

Large postal cards

THE DIFFERENT SIZES

Up until 1879 the Postal Cards are in size 140x75 mm  ("the small Postal Cards"), where after the size is 140x90 mm.


Postal Card 8 ore in size 140x75


Postal Card 8 ore in size 140x90 mm

 

VARIETIES

In frames, I show a lot of new varieties in the early (small) postal cards. Colours shows the different colour shades of blue that are often difficult to destinguish.

SEE ALSO

In three articles in NFT (Nordisk Filatelistisk Tidsskrift) I have descriped different varieties in the small postal cards. Read the articles here:

Article 1
Article 2
Article 3

DOUBLE POSTAL CARDS

 

© Copyright 2003 Lars Engelbrecht. All Rights Reserved

 Last updated: 5 August 2003